SANMARCO SQUARE 🇮🇹GRAND CANAL VENICE CITY || ITALY TRAVEL VLOG-3 || LONDON TO ITALY 7DAYS TOUR

Penned By Sudipa Parida

PC- Vivek Mishra

PC:Retouch- Sudipa Parida

Before I got over from the beautiful city vibes of Florence & Pisa, Tuscany it was time to head out to my next destination i.e. City of Canals VENICE. Honestly saying this was my best experience I have ever manifested in my whole life. I was awestruck to see that the actual Venice City has no motor way for vehicles at all beyond its entrance !!! its called Venezia in Italian, this city is a group of 118 small islands & that’s separated by canals & linked by over 400 bridges.

The best way to commute within Venice is Vaporetto.You can get your day passes from any local newspaper shops which is very common around the city.Even though you buy these tickets for regular commute but I still recommend to experience another way of city sightseeing that is nothing but with an iconic Gondola ride.


Check out these below places which you must visit in Venice city :-

St. Mark’s Square – Piazza San Marco, often known in English as St Mark’s Square, is the principal public square of Venice, Italy, where it is generally known just as la Piazza. What to say about this iconic place that is part of western culture, Stunning with St Marks church, the tower, various restaurants!!!! Piazza San Marco is the city’s main public square and contains its most famous buildings such as St Mark’s Basilica and the Doge’s Palace. Napoleon called it “the world’s most beautiful drawing room”. its main tourist destination, with a permanent abundance of photographers, tourists and pigeons.

Doge’s Palace – The Doge’s Palace is a palace built in Venetian Gothic style, and one of the main landmarks of the city of Venice in northern Italy. The palace was the residence of the Doge of Venice, the supreme authority of the former Republic. It was built in 1340, and extended and modified in the following centuries.Extremely crowded with so many people! But honestly so worth it.The plaza is incredible! The architecture, the style, the waterfront, the boats, it was sunny although cold when I went there but worth every minute of it.

Saint Mark’s Basilica – The Patriarchal Cathedral Basilica of Saint Mark, commonly known as St Mark’s Basilica, is the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Venice, northern Italy.

Rialto Bridge – The Rialto Bridge is the oldest of the four bridges spanning the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy. Connecting the sestieri of San Marco and San Polo, it has been rebuilt several times since its first construction as a pontoon bridge in 1173.

Grand Canal – The main waterway of Venice, Italy. The Grand Canal is the largest and most important canal in the Italian city of Venice & It takes your breath away. Must visit

Bridge of Sighs – The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone, has windows with stone bars, passes over the Rio di Palazzo, and connects the New Prison to the interrogation rooms in the Doge’s Palace. One of the must see spots at Venice and hearing the tale about it was the most interesting part.The story starts from Doges Palace at the Jail Section. You can have a look at the bridge from outside but you can walk through it only through the palace. Must visit !!!!! *

St Mark’s Campanile – St Mark’s Campanile is the bell tower of St Mark’s Basilica.

Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute-Baldassare Longhena’s magnificent basilica is prominently positioned near the entrance to the Grand Canal, its white stones, exuberant statuary and high domes gleaming spectacularly under the sun. The church makes good on an official appeal by the Venetian Senate directly to the Madonna in 1630, after 80,000 Venetians had been killed by plague. The Senate promised the Madonna a church in exchange for her intervention on behalf of Venice – no expense or effort spared.

Museo Correr -The Correr Museum is located in St. Mark Square since 1922 and occupies the spaces of the Napoleonic Wing and part of the New Attorney offices that were designed by Vincenzo Scamozzi a building that frames three quarters of the square. The design and realization of the Napoleonic wing belong to the time in which Venice was part of the kingdom of Italy when Napoleon was its sovereign between 1806 and 1814.

San Giorgio Maggiore –San Giorgio Maggiore is one of the most photographed basilicas in Venice. The travellers standing in Piazza San Marco looking over the canal will be stunned by the temple’s façade with the gondolas swaying in the Lagoon in front of it.The construction of the Basilica was completed in 1576 and the architect, Andrea Palladio, also designed the neighbouring church, Il Redentore.

Gondola Rides A must do for every tourist.

Venice Carnival masks – Venice carnival  is a centuries old tradition and one of the world’s most famous carnivals. … The tradition of the mask started in the 13th century when Venetians would hold celebrations and parties from December 26th until the start of Lent and wear elaborate masks to conceal their identity.

Constitution Bridge-This bridge is a very modern opera and it is harmoniously inserted in the Venetian context. The skeleton is made of steel. The steps and the parapet are made of tempered glass and Istria marble, all materials extensively used in the city.Spectacular was the laying of the bridge, even if quite discussed, due to some controversy concerning the enormous delay and the uncontrolled raise of costs (it cost around 12,5 millions of euros).

Ponte dell’Accademia –Can you imagine what it would be like if there was only one bridge to cross along the Grand Canal in Venice.For 300 years, this was the case because local residents had only the Rialto bridge and private boats for common transportation. However, when the Austrians gained power over Venice for the second time (following the defeat of Napoleon), they made several crucial changes in addition to those made by Napoleon himself. One of them was the construction of two more bridges at opposite ends of the Grand Canal in Venice; Ponte dell’ Accademia (The Accademia Bridge) and Ponte degli Scalzi.

Images by T.Dashfield Photography

The camera gave me an incredible freedom. It gave me the ability to parade through the world and look at people and things very, very closely. Carrie Mae Weems

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